Regnum Christi | Legionaries of Christ

Weekly Meditations Digest – June 14 to June 21

Sunday, June 14, 2020 – I Want to Live Forever

Monday, June 15, 2020 – Something Radically New

Tuesday, June 16, 2020 – We Are All Brothers and Sisters, Children of Our Heavenly Father

Wednesday, June 17, 2020 – The Danger of Vanity

Thursday, June 18, 2020 – The School of Prayer

Friday, June 19, 2020 – “Yes”

Saturday, June 20, 2020 – Blessed Is She Who Believed

Sunday, June 21, 2020 – Forming Bold Apostles


June 14, 2020 – Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ

I Want to Live Forever

 

Father Eamonn Shelly, LC

John 6: 51-58

“I am the living bread that came down from heaven. Whoever eats of this bread will live forever; and the bread that I will give for the life of the world is my flesh.” The Jews then disputed among themselves, saying, “How can this man give us his flesh to eat?” So, Jesus said to them, “Very truly, I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood have eternal life, and I will raise them up on the last day; for my flesh is true food and my blood is true drink. Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood abide in me, and I in them. Just as the living Father sent me, and I live because of the Father, so whoever eats me will live because of me. This is the bread that came down from heaven, not like that which your ancestors ate, and they died. But the one who eats this bread will live forever.”

Introductory Prayer: Lord Jesus, today I renew my faith in your true presence in the Eucharist. I believe you come down from heaven to be present in the host at every Mass and remain with me in the Tabernacle. You are the source of my hope. I long to be more united to you through this gift of yourself.

Petition: Lord, increase my devotion to you in the Eucharist.

  1. Fear Not, It Is I: There was a bishop who would jokingly speak about the fact that he was not very good-looking; in fact, he had no problem recognizing that he was quite ugly. One day, a lady who appreciated this very holy man approached him and asked him to sign a photo of him she had just bought. She wanted to frame it and hang it in her living room. The bishop wrote on the photo, “Fear not, it is I.” Even though in the Eucharist we see a piece of bread, through our faith we believe that behind this veil is the body of Christ. So, fear not, it is Christ.
  2. How Can This Be? The Jews disputed with Jesus about this difficult truth they found extremely hard to accept. So, too, many who go to Mass on Sunday don’t really believe in the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist. At times, maybe even we receive the Eucharist with a certain lack of awareness of what we are doing. In this way, just like these Jews, we allow a seed of doubt to enter our hearts. It is important to ask ourselves, “What do I do to ensure that I receive Christ in the Eucharist with the fitting dispositions of fervor, longing, gratitude, self-offering, etc.? Is what I’m presently doing enough?”
  3. You Will Never Die: Deep down in the heart of every man, woman and child has a yearning to live forever. On earth, only the Eucharist, Christ himself, can satisfy that thirst for the eternal. That is why we can experience so much peace and joy when we live a true devotion to the Eucharist and receive Our Lord with great reverence, faith and love. Truly, the Eucharist is the bread of life.

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus, I believe, but help my unbelief. Give me your Body in the Eucharist and grant me the grace to grow every day in my faith in your real presence in the Eucharist.

Resolution: I will try to make it to an additional Mass sometime during the week, in person, or online if that is not possible.

 


June 15, 2020 – Monday of the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time

Something Radically New

 

Father Walter Schu, LC

Matthew 5: 38-42

Jesus said to his disciples: “You have heard that it was said, An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth. But I say to you, offer no resistance to one who is evil. When someone strikes you on your right cheek, turn the other one to him as well. If anyone wants to go to law with you over your tunic, hand him your cloak as well. Should anyone press you into service for one mile, go with him for two miles. Give to the one who asks of you, and do not turn your back on one who wants to borrow.”

Introductory Prayer: Lord, you present a message that is not easy for my fallen nature to accept. However, I believe in your words, and I trust in you because you alone have the words of eternal life. As I begin this moment of prayer, I turn to you as one in need. I want only to please you in all I do.

Petition: Lord, help me to embrace your call to turn the other cheek.

  1. The Leitmotif: Can we discover a unifying thread in this week’s Gospel readings? One that stands out is the radical newness of Christ’s Kingdom. It is new in its fundamental principle: a charity that must extend to loving one’s very enemies (Monday and Tuesday). It is new in the intentions which must motivate all our actions (Wednesday). It is new in the way we are to pray to our Father in heaven (Thursday). And, finally, it is new in the radical demands it places upon us as followers of Christ: We must make this Kingdom our only treasure (Friday) and seek it above everything else in life (Saturday). What a privilege to be called to the mission of helping to establish such a Kingdom! What a joy, what an honor, what a glory to be the subjects of such a King! Do people encounter a “newness”, a freshness, in my approach to life? Is it rooted in Christ’s new teaching?
  2. A New Legislator: We find ourselves at the heart of Christ’s discourse in his Sermon on the Mount. Our Lord attributes to himself an authority that must have startled and even shocked his Jewish listeners. He claims the power to alter what has been proclaimed in the very Law of Moses and the prophets — the absolute source of authority for the Jewish faith. Remember that God gave Moses the Ten Commandments, and God put his word in the mouths of the prophets. So, when Jesus says, “You have heard it said…. But I say to you…,” only two alternatives are possible: Either Christ is a madman, or he is truly the Son of God, the one who has come “not to abolish the law and the prophets, but to fulfill them.” I may agree that he is truly the Son of God, but do I embrace all of his teachings?
  3. Turning the Other Cheek: It would certainly be hard to find words more radical than these. Who would dare to speak them, if not the Son of God himself? He would live them out fully in his own life, allowing himself to be nailed to the cross by evil men. But is it really possible for us to live them as his followers, as Christians? Do we really turn the other cheek when someone strikes us? If people demand something of us unjustly, do we give them even more than they ask? What could be the purpose of these commands from Christ, which seem to leave us vulnerable and defenseless? In the end, it is only such heroic charity that will be able to win over evil men to the cause of the Gospel. And that is precisely what Christ, our Savior, longs for. “God … desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth” (1 Timothy 2:3-4).

Conversation with Christ: Lord, I long to have a heart that is more like yours. Warm my selfish heart so that I will lovingly turn the other cheek as you ask of me. Help me to grow in zeal for all men to be saved and to come to know you in their lives.

Resolution: I will do an act of kindness for someone with whom it is difficult for me to get along.

 


 

June 16, 2020  – Tuesday of the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time

We Are All Brothers and Sisters, Children of Our Heavenly Father

 

Father Walter Schu, LC

Matthew 5: 43-48

Jesus said to his disciples: “You have heard that it was said, You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy. But I say to you, love your enemies, and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be children of your heavenly Father, for he makes his sun rise on the bad and the good, and causes rain to fall on the just and the unjust. For if you love those who love you, what recompense will you have? Do not the tax collectors do the same? And if you greet your brothers only, what is unusual about that? Do not the pagans do the same? So be perfect, just as your heavenly Father is perfect.”

Introductory Prayer: Lord, you present a message that is not easy for my fallen nature to accept. However, I believe in your words, and I trust in you because you alone have the words of eternal life. As I begin this moment of prayer, I turn to you as one in need. I want only to please you in all I do.

Petition: Lord, help me to love my enemies and pray for those who persecute me.

  1. True Love for Your Enemies: Nowhere does the radical newness of the Christian ethic stand out more clearly than in Christ’s simple phrase: “Love your enemies.” There are four words for “love” in Greek. Storge refers to the love between parents and children. Eros is the love of attraction between man and woman. Philia is the love of friendship. Finally, agape is love as goodwill, benevolent love that cannot be conquered, a love that wills only the good for the person loved. In his book, Love and Responsibility, Karol Wojtyla remarks that to love someone with truly benevolent love is to will God for them, since God is the supreme good of each human person. It is precisely love as agape that Christ asks from every one of his followers: “Pray for those who persecute you.”
  2. “Children of Your Heavenly Father”: Why does Christ ask, even demand, of us such a radical form of love? Precisely because that is how God the Father loves each and every one of his sons and daughters, with no consideration of whether they are good or evil. “For he makes his sun rise on the bad and the good and causes rain to fall on the just and the unjust.” How much the world around us would change if those with whom we came into contact perceived in us a love like that of the Father of mercies! His love is absolutely without self-interest. He continues to love and pour forth his gifts even when he is not loved in return. Christ calls us to a lofty and challenging ideal, but one that is capable of transforming lives. What joy could be greater than to be true sons and daughters of our heavenly Father?
  3. Seeking True Perfection Through Love: Why is Christ almost relentless in insisting that we must be perfect — and not just a human perfection, but as our heavenly Father is perfect? He knows that is the Father’s original plan for mankind, from the dawn of creation. “So, God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them” (Genesis 1:27). Christ is well aware that sin has darkened the divine image within us, that his call to perfect charity is not possible for our fallen human nature. But he is equally aware that by the power of his own death and resurrection, through the new life of the Holy Spirit whom he will send, God’s original plan for mankind will be restored. There can be no more powerful motive for hope, even in the midst of our own failures in charity and our human weaknesses.

Conversation with Christ: Thank you, Lord, for your radical message, for the constant challenge it is to me, never allowing me to become complacent or self-satisfied. Help me to be a better witness of Christian charity so that the world will believe in you.

Resolution: I will pray for those with whom I am experiencing difficulties and do an act of charity for them.

 


June 17, 2020  – Wednesday of the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time

The Danger of Vanity

 

Father Walter Schu, LC

Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18

Jesus said to his disciples: “Take care not to perform righteous deeds in order that people may see them; otherwise, you will have no recompense from your heavenly Father. When you give alms, do not blow a trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets to win the praise of others. Amen, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you give alms, do not let your left hand know what your right is doing, so that your almsgiving may be secret. And your Father who sees in secret will repay you. When you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, who love to stand and pray in the synagogues and on street corners so that others may see them. Amen, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you pray, go to your inner room, close the door, and pray to your Father in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will repay you. When you fast, do not look gloomy like the hypocrites. They neglect their appearance, so that they may appear to others to be fasting. Amen, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, so that you may not appear to be fasting, except to your Father who is hidden. And your Father who sees what is hidden will repay you.”

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I believe in you with a living faith. Though I am so inclined to sin and weakness, I trust in your mercy. I want to show my love for you in this meditation. I long for my recompense to come only from you, not from people’s applause.

Petition: Lord, help me to act with greater purity of intention in my life.

  1. Who Do You Seek to Please: In today’s Gospel reading, Christ presents a difficult challenge and, at the same time, a great consolation. His teaching can be summed up with a simple phrase: In everything we do, act always before God alone. At the end of our life, all that will remain is what we have done for God and our brothers and sisters. Everything else, all of our vanities, our desires to be esteemed, loved or taken into account will vanish on the last day, like fog disappears under the rays of the sun. The challenge is clear: to act before God with absolute purity of intention. But where is the consolation? Our heavenly Father “sees in secret.” What might never be perceived or recognized or appreciated by the world will one day be rewarded in heaven.
  2. Between You and God: Mother Theresa echoes the Gospel teaching in a brief poem entitled “It’s Between You and God.”
    People are often unreasonable, illogical and self-centered.
    Forgive them anyway.If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives.
    Be kind anyway.
    If you are successful, you will win some false friends and some true enemies.
    Succeed anyway.
    If you are honest and frank, people may cheat you.
    Be honest and frank anyway.
    What you spend years building, someone may destroy overnight.
    Build anyway.
    If you find serenity and happiness, others may be jealous.
    Be happy anyway.
    The good you do today, people will often forget tomorrow.
    Do good anyway.
    Give the world the best you have, and it may never be enough.
    Give the world the best you have anyway.
    Why?
    Because in the final analysis, all of this is between you and God….
    It was never between you and them anyway.
  3. Our Everlasting Reward: Christ declares three times that hypocrites who act before others have already received their reward. One day each of us will stand alone before Christ. Our eternal destiny will depend upon the outcome of that moment. May we not discover to our chagrin that our hands are empty because we have secretly acted to win the applause of men. Rather, may we perform our good deeds in secret, not letting our left hand know what our right is doing. Then our heavenly Father, “who sees what is hidden” will repay us.

Conversation with Christ: Thank you, Lord, for always seeing what is hidden, for always being ready to reward what is done for you. Your words and the example of holy men and women inspire me on this point. I wish to live facing you and eternity and to give up all my vain ambitions and worries about what others think of my actions.

Resolution: I will renew my purity of intention in the different activities of the day, doing them out of love for Christ and to help establish his Kingdom.

 


June 18, 2020  – Thursday of the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time

The School of Prayer

  

Father Walter Schu, LC

Matthew 6: 7-15

Jesus said to his disciples: “In praying, do not babble like the pagans, who think that they will be heard because of their many words. Do not be like them. Your Father knows what you need before you ask him. This is how you are to pray: ‘Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, thy Kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.’ If you forgive others their transgressions, your heavenly Father will forgive you. But if you do not forgive others, neither will your Father forgive your transgressions.”

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I believe in you. I believe that you love me, that you are close by my side, and that you will be walking with me throughout this day. I trust in you, Lord. I trust you more than I trust myself because you are infinitely good and all powerful. I love you, Jesus. I love you because you died on the cross for me, to save me.

Petition: Lord, teach me to pray.

  1. Absolute Trust in God’s Providence: “Your Father knows what you need before you ask him.” Christ’s words are an inexhaustible source of consolation and hope as they encourage us to turn constantly to our Father in prayer. “True piety is not so much a matter of the amount of words as of the frequency and the love with which a Christian turns toward God in all the events, great or small, of his day” (St. Matthew, The Navarre Bible, p. 72). But if our Father already knows our needs, why should we even present them to him in prayer? St. Augustine assures us that while we pray, God is molding our heart and soul so that we will be prepared to receive the good things he desires to give us in answer to our prayers.
  2. The Perfect Prayer: St. Augustine affirms that the Lord’s Prayer is so perfect that it sums up in a few words everything man needs to ask God for (cf. Sermon, 56). “It is usually seen as being made up of an invocation and seven petitions — three to do with praise of God and four with the needs of men” (St. Matthew, The Navarre Bible, p. 72). The first two petitions, that God’s name be sanctified among all people, and that his Kingdom may come, should touch us in the depth of our being. We are called to be apostles of that Kingdom, to spread love for Christ among our fellow men. Our apostolic zeal should be enkindled each time we pronounce those words of the Lord’s Prayer. Asking for God’s will to be done means that we seek to conform ourselves with his will in all of our thoughts and actions.
  3. Our Spiritual and Human Needs: “Give us this day our daily bread.” Even though we work to earn our daily bread with the sweat of our brow, it is still a gift from God. We ask only for what we need each day. The Church Fathers also see in this petition a request for the Eucharist, the Bread of Life. We strive to live so as to be worthy to receive the Eucharist each day. Christ then instructs us that when we ask God for forgiveness, we, too, must be willing to forgive others in the same way we ourselves are forgiven by our Father. Do I live this teaching fully in my life as a follower of Christ? Finally, we ask to be freed from temptation that is beyond our strength, and to be delivered from evil — or the Evil One. The Father is much more powerful than any temptation the devil can send against us. With what confidence and trust does Christ ask us to conclude the “Our Father!”

Conversation with Christ: Thank you, Lord, for teaching us how to pray. Thank you for the confidence and trust in our Father that your words inspire. Help me, so that the words of your own prayer may always be on my lips and in my heart.

Resolution: I will pray the “Our Father” as a colloquy with God at different moments during the day.

 


June 19, 2020  – Solemnity of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus

“YES”

 

Father Eamonn Shelly, LC

Matthew 11:25-30

At that time Jesus said in reply, “I give praise to you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, for although you have hidden these things from the wise and the learned you have revealed them to the childlike. Yes, Father, such has been your gracious will. All things have been handed over to me by my Father. No one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son wishes to reveal him. “Come to me, all you who labor and are burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am meek and humble of heart; and you will find rest for yourselves. For my yoke is easy, and my burden light.”

Introductory Prayer: Lord Jesus, I ask you for the grace during this meditation to say “yes” to you at each moment of my life. What a beautiful program—that every day I renew my unconditional “yes” to you. This acceptance must be based in faith and trust. I believe in you because you are truth itself and are faithful to your promises. You never abandon me or let me down. I want this moment of prayer to be an expression of my love for you, seeking to console you instead of being consoled.

Petition: Lord, grant that I may be generous with God and others.

  1. Short and Sweet: When we confront the daily struggles and trials, we tend to get confused because we keep turning the problems around and around until they become such a tangled mess that they really begin to drag us down. Something similar can happen in our spiritual lives too. We begin to juggle around a lot of ideas and good desires and proposals but never really get anywhere because we lack clarity and direction. All we really need is just one idea and one word: “yes”. It’s a word which is easy to say, but at times difficult to fulfill. It needs to be part of our daily vocabulary to say yes to God and to our brothers and sisters. Jesus says to us, “Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am meek and humble of heart; and you will find rest for yourselves. For my yoke is easy, and my burden light.”
  2. Learn from Christ: Our Lord Christ Jesus is the one from whom we learn what it means to say “yes.” He said “yes” at the moment of his incarnation and birth. He said “yes” during those 30 silent years in Nazareth. He said “yes” at the moments of his passion, death and resurrection, and he continues to say “yes” in the Eucharist. All over the world he is present, giving himself to us once again through this wonderful sacrament.
  3. Sacred Heart of Jesus: A heart that always says “yes” is a heart that loves. Christ’s heart is a heart that loves all of us with a love that is infinite. The Sacred Heart of Jesus seeks to show mankind that his love reaches even to all those who say “no” to his will. His heart invites all of them back into his flock. We need never despair. All we have to do is turn back to him, convert. He is waiting for us with open arms.

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus, I know that you always said “yes” to the will of the Father. I ask you to grant me the same willingness to do your most holy will at each moment of my life.

Resolution: I will pray an Our Father for peace in the world.

 


 

June 20, 2020 – Memorial of the Immaculate Heart of the Blessed Virgin Mary  

Blessed is She Who Believed

 

Luke 2:41-51

Each year Jesus’ parents went to Jerusalem for the feast of Passover, and when he was twelve years old, they went up according to festival custom. After they had completed its days, as they were returning, the boy Jesus remained behind in Jerusalem, but his parents did not know it. Thinking that he was in the caravan, they journeyed for a day and looked for him among their relatives and acquaintances, but not finding him, they returned to Jerusalem to look for him. After three days they found him in the Temple, sitting in the midst of the teachers, listening to them and asking them questions, and all who heard him were astounded at his understanding and his answers. When his parents saw him, they were astonished, and his mother said to him, “Son, why have you done this to us? Your father and I have been looking for you with great anxiety.” And he said to them, “Why were you looking for me? Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house?” But they did not understand what he said to them. He went down with them and came to Nazareth and was obedient to them; and his mother kept all these things in her heart.

Introductory Prayer: Dearest Mother Mary, Christ your Son learned to love from your loving example. Teach me to love in the same way. Instruct me in the way of your virtues. Help me to make use of every opportunity to grow in them. Never let me miss the opportunities life gives me to love and form myself in virtue. I always want to love the way you love.

Petition: Mary, my Mother, help me be your faithful child. Bring me to your son.

  1. Not Everything Is Clear From the Outset: Mary has a mother’s heart that wants to love the loves of her Son. For Mary, the road was not always clear. There would be many trials and difficulties. Nevertheless, Mary is resolved to follow her Son. She wants to follow him, understanding the mission. She cares for him in every way – even spiritually. There were many surprises in store for her as Christ matured and prepared for his mission. She never expected this one: losing her son for three days, at such an early age. Her son desired to be in his Father’s house and prepare his work. He loved being there and was preparing for the day when he would go out and actively do the work he had been sent to complete. Mary too was preparing for that day and Christ helped her get ready.
  2. She Stored All These Things Up In Her Heart: It was hard for Mary to understand the full meaning of this moment. Being a woman of prayer and contemplation, she stored all these things up in her heart where she could recall them, reflect on them and compare them to other moments of her mission. What did all this mean? What did it point to? God’s plan would only reveal itself with time and Mary would be ready for it. It was not so much understanding that she needed but rather acceptance and fidelity to complete it. Mary had a contemplative heart that sought to unite itself and identify itself to the mission of her Son. She knew that she had a part to play in that mission and that she would need to prepare herself for it through prayer.
  3. Take Mary’s Hand: We will never understand the purpose and meaning of our life unless we pray and contemplate like Mary did. It takes time, patience and a great deal of simplicity and trust. “Blessed is she that believed that the promises made to her would be fulfilled!” exclaims her cousin Elizabeth after the annunciation by the angel Gabriel. We are blessed when we can believe. It may take a long time to see the fulfillment of God’s designs in our lives too. We need to be like Mary and follow through by faithfully walking the path that is marked out for us. It can be a path that is not clear. We don’t need to know all of what lies ahead – just where we need to walk. Mary identified with her Son’s mission with her whole heart. She invites us to identify with it too. She will not fail to take you by the hand and lead you along that unclear, difficult and unknown path.

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus Christ, when you had already given us everything – your life, your love, your Body and Blood in the Eucharist – from the cross you gave us the gift of your Mother. I thank you for this great gift. I want to be her faithful child. I want to imitate all her virtues, especially her faithfulness to you up to and beyond the moment of the cross. Grant me the grace to accompany both you and your mother at the foot of the cross. I want to follow you closely and perfectly as Mary did. I want to belong only to you and do only your will.

Resolution: I will ask Mary to shape all Christian virtues in me by my daily prayer to her in the Rosary. I will also make a special visit to her at one of her statues or images this week.

 


June 21, 2020  – Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Forming Bold Apostles

 

Matthew 10:26-33

Jesus said to the Twelve: “So have no fear of them; for nothing is covered up that will not be uncovered, and nothing secret that will not become known. What I say to you in the dark, tell in the light; and what you hear whispered, proclaim from the housetops. Do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather fear him who can destroy both soul and body in hell. Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground apart from your Father. And even the hairs of your head are all counted. So, do not be afraid; you are of more value than many sparrows. “Everyone therefore who acknowledges me before others, I also will acknowledge before my Father in heaven; but whoever denies me before others, I also will deny before my Father in heaven.”

Introductory Prayer: Lord, thank you for this day in which we celebrate your resurrection. I believe that my life will one day be victoriously united to yours. I hope in your mercy and infinite kindness. Today as I receive you in the Eucharist may I be caught by the fire of your love.

Petition: Lord, let me be a light to those around me.

  1. No Fear: “So have no fear of them.” Christ opens a new perspective for us by his words. He gives us the assurance that we are safe even when the world threatens and tries to deceive us. He shows us that we are building on solid ground by preaching the Gospel. The truth about God and man we proclaim corresponds to what is deepest in man’s heart and witnessing to this truth always carries a special grace that resonates in the world. And Christ’s promise of eternal life “protects” us as we engage in his mission.
  2. God’s Amplifiers: “What you have heard whispered, proclaim from the housetops.” Christ has made a special effort in our lives to make his good news penetrate us, whispering gently in our ears and hearts. He is confident that he is sparking something that will change us deeply. The quiet, intimate message and the first flames of love will blaze into a fire that will touch those around us. We bring to others what we ourselves have contemplated in prayer, in those intimate moments where Christ speaks to us of his love and truth. We should allow our hearts to resonate powerfully during prayer so as to be the instruments Christ will use to reach others.
  3. Safe in Our Father’s Arms: “Everyone therefore who acknowledges me before others, I will also acknowledge before my Father in heaven.” The paradox of our lives is that we have been sent on a great adventure whose goal is to get back home, back to our Father’s house. The Father asks us, accompanied by his Son, to discover the paths in our heart that lead to him and to invite all those around us to come home. Christ assures us that we are safe on this journey, that our trials and risks are but a small — yet very precious — contribution to the love that is awaiting us. Our Father waits for us. Our home is only a step away at each minute. We know that when we bravely put him above our fears, he will reward us with a love that no one can take away.

Conversation with Christ: Lord, I know that you have the last word. You are the Lord of life and history. Help me to not be afraid to build your kingdom around me. I realize today that my desire to tell the world about you is your grace. Help me to remember that with you I can bear fruit that will last forever.

Resolution: I will invite a friend or acquaintance to join me for Mass or in praying the rosary this week.

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